Dictionary search results

Showing 1-50 of 150 results

them British & World English

Used as the object of a verb or preposition to refer to two or more people or things previously mentioned or easily identified

us and them British & World English

Expressing a sense of division within a group of people

hers British & World English

Used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with a female person or animal previously mentioned

his British & World English

Used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with a male person or animal previously mentioned

mine1 British & World English

Used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with the speaker

mine2 British & World English

Dig in (the earth) for coal or other minerals

ours British & World English

Used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with the speaker and one or more other people previously mentioned or easily identified

theirs British & World English

Used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with two or more people or things previously mentioned

us British & World English

Used by a speaker to refer to himself or herself and one or more other people as the object of a verb or preposition

yours British & World English

Used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with the person or people that the speaker is addressing

woe betide British & World English

Used humorously to warn (someone) that they will be in trouble if they do a specified thing

with the best of them British & World English

As well or as much as anyone

you can't win them all British & World English

Said to express consolation or resignation after failure in a contest

of —— fame British & World English

Having a particular famous association; famous for having or being ——

fine1 British & World English

Used to express one’s agreement with or acquiescence to something

here's to someone/thing British & World English

Used to wish health or success before drinking

on with British & World English

Having a romantic relationship with (someone)

—— that was British & World English

As the specified person or thing was formerly known

up with —— British & World English

An exclamation expressing support for a stated person or thing

I can't win British & World English

There is no course of action will bring success or please people

if you can't beat them, join them British & World English

If you are unable to outdo rivals in some endeavour, you might as well cooperate with them and thereby possibly gain an advantage

bully for you! British & World English

Used to express admiration or approval

cold-shoulder someone British & World English

Reject or be deliberately unfriendly to someone

down with —— in down1 British & World English

Shouted to express strong dislike of a specified person or thing

more fool —— British & World English

Used to convey that a specified person is behaving unwisely

where one lives British & World English

At, to, or in the right, vital, or most vulnerable spot

—— rides again British & World English

Used to indicate that someone or something has reappeared unexpectedly and with new vigour

talking of —— British & World English

While we are on the subject of —— (said when one is reminded of something by the present topic of conversation)

one could use in use British & World English

One would like or benefit from

in someone/thing's way British & World English

If regarded from a particular standpoint appropriate to that person or thing

what about ——? British & World English

Used when asking for information or an opinion on something

that's the breaks British & World English

That’s the way things turn out (used to express resigned acceptance of a situation)

where someone is at British & World English

Someone’s true or fundamental nature or character

as best one can British & World English

As effectively as possible under the circumstances

if it kills one British & World English

Whatever the problems or difficulties involved

pair British & World English

Two people related in some way or considered together

I don't blame you British & World English

Used to indicate that one agrees that the action or attitude taken was reasonable

fair play to someone British & World English

Used as an expression of approval when someone has done something praiseworthy or the right thing under the circumstances

there's —— for you British & World English

Used ironically to indicate a particularly poor example of (a quality mentioned)

for all someone knows British & World English

Used to express the limited scope or extent of one’s information

what does —— know? British & World English

Used to indicate that someone knows nothing about the subject in question

what is he like? British & World English

Used as an expression of light-hearted incredulity at behaviour regarded as foolish or eccentric

a new one British & World English

An account, idea, or joke not previously encountered by someone

the poor man's —— British & World English

An inferior or cheaper substitute for the thing specified

shame on you British & World English

Used to reprove someone for something of which they should be ashamed

sweet talk British & World English

Insincerely praise (someone) in order to persuade them to do something


Page: 1 2 3