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15 Lists and tables

15.2 Tables

15.2.1 General principles

A table is a set of data systematically displayed in rows and columns. Tables are best used for information that is too complex to be presented clearly in a list or in running text, and particularly for information intended for comparison, either within a single table or between similar tables.

Tables should be numbered by chapter or section in the order in which each is mentioned (Table 1.1, Table 1.2, etc.) If there are only a few tables they may be numbered in a single sequence throughout the text. Frequent or large tables may be better placed at the end of the chapter or as an appendix to text; tables in an appendix are numbered separately. Unlike lists, tables should not be broken across pages unless their size makes a break unavoidable.

Consider whether tabular presentation is the clearest means of setting out the material. It might be more digestibly presented in a few sentences, or as a figure or graph. Two or more tables might be better merged, or a large one split up. For example, large tables viewed on a small screen can be problematic as they can be unreadable if zoomed out to show the whole structure or hard to interpret if column and row headings are not visible at larger font settings; careful consideration should be given as to whether to split the table into smaller components, for example, or to display the data in a different way.

The information must be relevant to the textual argument and correspond to what the text describes. It should not merely repeat the text. The order of elements in the table should be transparent; if no other order can be imposed on the table as a whole, alphabetical or numerical order may be best.

Omit vertical rules in tables—presentation is clearer and less cluttered without them. Horizontal rules should be kept to a minimum, although head and tail rules are included in most cases.

Most word-processing programs have a tool to create and edit tables; most page layout software can import the result but success depends partly on how well the table has been prepared. In the table body remove unnecessary spaces and tabs, and avoid adding a new line with a hard return—introduce an extra row instead. (A swift way of cleaning up a badly prepared table is to copy it into a blank spreadsheet then back into the document.) Alternatively, present data as columns separated by single tabs, rather than in table cells; include a tab for every column including empty cells. Do not use multiple tabs or spaces between columns. For either method preferably apply word-processor styles to the different table elements: title, column headings, body other than final row, final row, and notes.

Tables can also be prepared efficiently as spreadsheets but authors and editors should be aware that cell formulas will not import into other types of software, only the result of the formula; this is not a problem provided the table is not pasted back into the spreadsheet, e.g. for amendment. Most spreadsheet file formats can be imported into page layout software; however, spreadsheets should not be embedded in word-processed documents but presented separately.

Be prepared for the fact that badly prepared tables may be rekeyed if quicker than tidying up after an unsuccessful import. It is helpful if hard copy or a PDF that shows intended layout accompanies the files, in case vertical alignment is lost. Drawn elements within a table, such as chemical structures, may need to be treated as artwork. When in doubt, flag problematic tables or seek advice from the publisher.

Page layout software treats tables as separate elements, which are positioned once the text has flowed into the page template; consequently it may be more convenient if tables are presented separately rather than in situ in the document—it is worth checking whether your designer or publisher has a preference. If no guidance is given, gather the tables together in one place, or group them by chapter for example, or present them in sequence at the end of the document if only a few. The approximate position of tables should be clearly flagged—by a placement indication in the margin of hard copy or on a separate line in an electronic text, for example: <<TABLE 1 NEAR HERE>>

All tables should also be cited by number in the text. Citations can be of the style Table 2.1 summarizes the planning processes, or in the passive form The planning processes are summarized (Table 2.1) … Avoid positional references such as ‘the table above’ or ‘the following table’, as the final paginated layout is likely to be different from that in the script.

Running heads can be set normally over full-page portrait (upright) or landscape (turned or broadside) tables, or they can be omitted; consistency is important.

If the author-number reference system is used in the text (see 17.4), any references cited in the table should be numbered in sequence according to where the table appears on the page; if the final position is unknown, number according to where the table is first cited or where it is likely to appear—some adjustment may be needed on page proofs.

15.2.2 Table headings

Tables must have headings, which are usually positioned above the table, consisting of the table number and a title that describes what the table contains. The title may use minimal or maximal capitalization according to the style of the work as a whole; no full point is needed after the table number or at the end of the heading.

When units are the same throughout the table they may be defined in the heading, for example:

Table 15.1 Price of apples, by region, 1954–1976 ($/ton)

The heading may also be used to expose the logic behind the order in which the material is presented in the table, for example:

Table 8.1 Tree and shrub species used in hedging (ordered by frequency of use)

15.2.3 Column and row headings

The length of column and row headings should be reduced to a minimum, so any repeated information should be removed to the table heading. Similar tables should be treated similarly. Capitalize only the first word and proper names in each heading; do not include end punctuation. Do not number headings unless the numbers are referred to in the text. Spans in headings must not overlap: 1920–9, 1930–9, 1940–9 rather than 1920–30, 1930–40, 1940–50.

Units, where needed, are usually in parentheses, and should not be repeated in the body.

Column headings with common elements can be combined over a ‘straddle’ or ‘spanner’ rule (see Table 15.1).

Totals may be set off by a space or a rule (see Table 15.2). The word ‘Total’ may be formatted differently from the body.

Table 15.1 Per cent of deaths from cancer attributable to smoking, 1975 and 1995

Source: Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 4th edn, vol. 1 (Oxford University Press, 2003).

Country

Male

Female

1975

1995

1975

1995

Australia

39

32

4

14

Finland

46

37

1

4

France

33

38

0

2

Hungary

36

53

5

15

UK

52

40

12

20

US

42

43

10

25

Table 15.2 New Zealand casualties 1939–1945

Source: R. Kay (ed.), Chronology: New Zealand in the war, 1939–1945 (Wellington, 1968).

Branch

Deaths

Wounded

Prisoners

Interned

Total

Army

6,839

15,324

7,863

30,026

Navy

573

170

54

3

800

Air Force

4,149

255

552

23

4,979

Merchant navy

110

total

11,671

15,749

8,469

26

35,805

Row headings (also called stub or side headings) may or may not have a heading like other columns. If they do have a heading, ensure that it is appropriate and relevant to all of the stubs. Where row headings turn over to another line, data should be aligned consistently with either the last or the first line of the side heading.

15.2.4 Body of table

The body of a table is simply the tabular data introduced and ordered by the columns and stub. Where data drawn from a variety of sources has to be recast to allow comparison, ensure that this does not introduce inaccuracy or anachronism, or distort the material’s integrity, especially if the source is in copyright.

The unit(s) used in the table should suit the information: for example, national agricultural production figures may be easier to compare if rounded to 1,000 tons. Rounding also saves space, but editors should not make wholesale changes without querying them with the author. Tables intended for comparison should ideally present their data consistently in similar units. Ensure that abbreviations are consistently applied from one table to another, and that all units and percentages are defined. Exclude end punctuation. Mathematical operators (+, –, >, etc.) may be close up to surrounding digits to save space if necessary. Ensure that the correct symbols are used for minus signs, hyphens, and en and em rules; on hard copy mark their first occurrence in each table. Add zeros in front of decimal points if omitted; the exception may be probability values, for example p < .05, as house styles vary.

Familiar abbreviations are acceptable, such as %, &, country abbreviations, and those well known in the reader’s discipline. Ambiguous abbreviations such as n/a (‘not applicable’ or ‘not available’) and unfamiliar abbreviations must be explained in the notes (see 15.2.5): the reader should be able to understand the table independently of the text, particularly in digital product as the table may open in a separate window or screen. Repeat information rather than use ditto marks. Em rules or en rules are often used in empty fields, but can indicate either ‘no data’ or ‘not available’, so it may be better to specify which is the case.

Turn-lines in simple items in columns are indented 1 em, with no extra vertical space between items (see for example column 2 in Table 15.3). Turn-lines in discursive or run-on items (for example data in a chronology) can be set full left in a column as panels or blocks of text, not indented, with a space between each item (see for example column 4 in Table 15.3).

Related figures in a single column should have the same number of decimal places. Unrelated figures may have a different number of decimal places, but only if reflecting different levels of accuracy. Editors should check with the author before rounding them to a common level. Percentage totals may vary slightly above or below 100 per cent as a result of rounding.

When statistical matter within each column is unrelated, align it on the left with the column heading (see Table 15.4). Optionally, the longest line can be designed so that it is centred under the heading, if the result suits the material better.

Table 15.3 Beaufort wind scale

Sources: Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Meteorological Tables (1966); Hydrographer of the Navy (UK).

Force

Description of wind

Mean wind speed (knots)

Specification for use at sea

0

calm

less than 1

Sea like a mirror

1

light air

1–3

Ripples with appearance of scales are formed, but without foam crests

2

light breeze

4–6

Small wavelets, still short but more pronounced; crests have a glass appearance and do not break

3

gentle breeze

7–10

Large wavelets; crests begin to break; foam of glassy appearance, perhaps scattered white horses

4

moderate breeze

11–16

Small waves becoming longer; fairly frequent white horses

5

fresh breeze

17–21

Moderate waves, taking a more pronounced long form; many white horses are formed

6

strong breeze

22–7

Large waves begin to form; the white foam crests are more extensive everywhere (probably some spray)

7

moderate gale or near gale

28–33

Sea heaps up and white foam from breaking waves begins to be blown in streaks along the direction of the wind

8

fresh gale or gale

34–40

Moderately high waves of greater length; edges of crests begin to break into spindrift; foam is blown in well-marked streaks

9

strong gale

41–7

High waves; dense streaks of foam; crests of waves begin to topple, tumble, and roll over

10

whole gale or storm

48–55

Very high waves with long overhanging crests; the resulting foam is blown in dense white streaks; the sea takes a white appearance; the tumbling of the sea becomes heavy and shock-like; visibility affected

11

storm or violent storm

56–63

Exceptionally high waves at sea; the sea is completely covered with white patches of foam; visibility affected

12+

hurricane

64 and above

The air is filled with foam and spray; sea completely white with driving spray; visibility very seriously affected

When statistical matter within the columns is related, align it so that the longest item aligns with the column heading and other items align with the decimal point or with the final digit on the right (see Table 15.5).

Table 15.4 Comparison of four forests with infection present

Forest

Black

New

Sherwood

Speymouth

Age

20

43

35

69

Area sampled, acres

6.9

11.2

7.5

27.6

No. of trees

10,350

4,702

2,650

945

No. of infected trees

163

98

50

23

Infected trees, %

1.63

0.9

20.3

10.7

Chi-square for observed values

7.83

11.09

4.98

too small

Table 15.5 Working days lost through strikes per 1,000 workers, six countries, 1960–1999 (annual averages)

Source: S. Ackroyd et al. (eds), Oxford Handbook of Work and Organization (Oxford University Press, 2005), derived from: J. Davies, ‘International Comparisons of Labour Disputes in 1999’, Labour Market Trends, 109/4; D. Bird, ‘International Comparisons of Industrial Disputes in 1989 and 1990’, Employment Gazette, 99/12; Employment Gazette, 90/2; Department of Employment Gazette, 79/2.

1960–4

1971–5

1980–4

1990–5

1995–9

France

352

232

90

36

98

Germany

34

57

50

17

1

Italy

1,220

1,367

950

148

33

Japan

302

188

10

3

2

United Kingdom

242

1,186

480

29

23

United States

722

484

160

33

13

15.2.5 Notes to tables

Notes fall directly beneath the table to which they refer; they are not incorporated with the text’s footnote system. Set notes to table width, normally one size down from table size. General notes, notes on specific parts of the table, and probability values should appear in this order; source notes may go first or last provided they are treated consistently. Ensure that notes to a table cannot be mistaken for text recommencing after the table. General and source notes are uncued and often preceded by Note: and Source: respectively. The reference structure of source notes matches that used elsewhere in the work. Each note should generally begin on a new line and end with a full point (see Table 15.6), although notes of a kind can run on, separated by semicolons, to save space:

CI = confidence interval; OR = odds ratio; SD = standard deviation

Mark specific notes with a system of indices different from that used in the text (for example * † §), as in Table 15.6, or superscript letters or numbers (italic or roman). Cues in a table read across; for example, a cue in the last column of the first row precedes a cue in the first column of the second row.

Probability values may be indicated by a system of asterisks, in which case the convention should be explained in a note: ‘*p < .05; **p < .01; ***p < .001’. Editors should not impose other symbols in this case.

Table 15.6 Issues of the de luxe edition of Ulysses, copies 1–1,000

* Autographed by Joyce.

This issue, the cheapest of the three, was still 5–7 times costlier than the average book.

Price

Copies

Paper

France(FF)

UK(£/s./d.)

USA($)

1–100*

Holland handmade

350

7/7/-

30

101–250

Verge d'Arches

250

5/5/-

22

251–1,000

linen

150

3/3/-

12

15.2.6 Presentation on the page

Tables may be placed on the page in portrait or landscape format. Authors are not responsible for determining the format in which tables will be set. A wide table may fit a page’s measure if the arrangement of column and stub heads is reversed, but editors should consult the author first. Do not rearrange similar or related tables into differing structures.

Large portrait and landscape tables may be presented over two or more pages of text. Hard-copy editors should indicate preferred places where a large table may be split; on-screen editors can do the same on a PDF or in a note to the designer. Headings do not need to be repeated where continued tables can be read across or down a facing page. If the table continues on a verso page, however, indicate which headings need to be repeated. On-screen editors should not repeat headings in files that will be imported into page-layout software as that will be done automatically.

In page proofs insert a ‘continued’ line, such as ‘Table 2 cont.’, only if the table turns over to a verso page, not if it extends over facing pages. When several continued tables are given in succession, a short form of each table’s title can be helpful.

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