Translation of Mohican in Spanish:

Mohican

Pronunciation: /məʊˈhiːkən/

n

  • 1.1 (American Indian) mohicano, -na (m,f)
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    • The US has hundreds of tribes of Native Americans, from the larger and familiar names of Apache, Sioux, Cherokee and Mohicans to the smaller and lesser-known Catawba, Kalispel and Quapaw.
    • Another ethnic group, the Mahicans, are descendants of American Indians who were brought to Saint David's Island from New York in the 1600s.
    • He even went to Boston and Plymouth to consolidate an alliance with the Sokoquis, the Pennacooks, and the Mahicans against the Iroquois.
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    • With the advent of war, Plymouth gained support from New England's other colonies and from Mohegans, Pequots, and many Christian Indians.
    • Occom led many Christian Mohegans away from Connecticut in 1785, to join with other Christian southern New England tribal members in exodus to Brotherton, New York.
    • Mason, one of the founders of Norwich, and a force of Englishmen and Mohegans, are accused of burning down a Pequot village in 1637 during a war with the tribe.
    1.2
    (mohican)
    (hairstyle) (BrE) corte (m) de pelo a lo mohicano
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    • In the last few years the soccer star has sported shoulder-length hair, a Mohican and ‘cornrows’ but is probably most famed for his £300 skinhead.
    • The models wore sky-high Mohicans, stripy knee-length and bright ankle socks (along with spiky heels) and carried teddy bears on chains.
    • The bride's father wore a gangster outfit complete with trilby and spats, Andy's punk friends sported colourful Mohicans and four of the guests came as the Addams Family.

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