Translation of Samaritan in Spanish:

Samaritan

Pronunciation: /səˈmærətn; səˈmærɪtən/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 [Bible] samaritano, (masculine, feminine) the good Samaritan el buen samaritano
    More example sentences
    • R. HaXohen instead groups contemporary non-orthodox Jews with the ancient Samaritans, a group of deviant Jews.
    • Because the Samaritans recognized only the Pentateuch as authoritative, references later in the OT stipulating worship at the Jerusalem temple were not considered binding.
    • The advantage the Jews had over the Samaritans was the Bible which instructed them in the acceptable way of approaching God.
    1.2
    ( also samaritan)
    (helpful person) buen samaritano, (masculine, feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The Belfast man and his wife Josephine were stranded for an hour in their car along the Ballydugan Road before a good Samaritan came to their rescue.
    • Just before the police are called, a Good Samaritan, posing as a police officer, steps in to save him.
    • A quick thinking Samaritan jumped over the wall and threw the drowning man a lifebuoy but he was unable to hold on due to the strong waves and cold water.
    1.3the Samaritans (charitable organization) los samaritanos
    More example sentences
    • People do get depressed and the Samaritans is an excellent organisation to help people through harder times.
    • In the past, unpaid volunteers have made professional-level contributions to many charitable activities, such as the lifeboat service, the Samaritans, and care of the elderly.
    • The work being done quietly and anonymously by the Samaritans organisation has a role to play in helping those going through crisis periods in their lives.

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Cultural fact of the day

The National Police (Policía Nacional) was set up in Spain in 1976. Its members patrol provincial capitals and big cities, which are responsible for its finance, administration, and recruitment. Although armed, it has never been considered a repressive force, unlike the Guardia Civil.