There are 2 translations of bind in Spanish:

bind1

Pronunciation: /baɪnd/

vt (past & past p bound)

  • 1 (tie, fasten) [person/captive] atar, amarrar; [wheat/corn] agavillar their hands and feet were bound los ataron or amarraron de pies y manos the ties that bind us to our loved ones los lazos que nos unen a los seres queridos
    More example sentences
    • Within a few seconds, its forelegs were bound together tightly, and its tail was fastened to its hind legs.
    • Religion and art are tightly bound together, interpenetrating each other.
    • Dominick's hands and feet were bound together by thick rope and he could not stand up or attempt to escape.
    More example sentences
    • She was bound from head to foot, her mouth gagged.
    • It was rather weak at first, but grew so rapidly that, had he been able to do anything other then feel pain, he might have ripped himself free from the restraints that bound him.
    • Two medical personnel had just shot her mother with a tranquilizer dart and had bound her with restraining cloth.
    More example sentences
    • She is a landed immigrant in Canada and bound by bail terms imposed Dec. 18.
    • However, the family considered their contractual obligations binding.
    • Less bound by legal procedure, such a commission can more quickly document a greater number of victims of authoritarian repression than the courts.
    More example sentences
    • The parties will be bound by and comply with any decision of the expert.
    • But what they have in common is the desire to express themselves musically in new ways, not being bound by what they have done in the past or what the audience may expect of them.
    • A specification ought to be an epitome of the ideal because it should describe what is required without being bound by what currently exists.
  • 2 2.1 (wrap) envolver* they bind their heads with turbans se envuelven la cabeza con turbantes 2.2

    bind (up)

    [wound] vendar
    More example sentences
    • A passing taxi driver saw him, stopped to bind his wounds with bandages from his first aid kit, thus saving his life, and called an ambulance.
    • He dealt with that first, smearing salve over the bandage with which he bound the wound, and then attended to the many bruises.
    • Soon, she had cleaned the wounds, and bound them with bandages.
    2.3 (in sewing) ribetear to bind off (AmE) cerrar*
    More example sentences
    • Viviane's deep red hair was bound up into a bun, although some of her hair was free anyway and very curly.
    • To prevent fluid buildup, she used bandages to bind her legs tightly, from toe to thigh, for 10 hours a day.
    • Some bundles of cardboard are bound in a way that airlines can use them as ballast, an extra weight required when the plane doesn't have enough cargo or passengers.
  • 3 [Law] obligar* signing this document doesn't bind you to anything la firma de este documento no lo obliga or compromete a nada
    More example sentences
    • But Samantha Leigh, prosecuting, said trouble started in 1998 when Henson received a bind over from magistrates for a common assault on Mrs Williams.
    • It can be inferred from the decision which he made to seek a bind over at that time that he had concluded, at that point at least, that there was still a risk of a continued breach of the peace.
    • Where the State meets its burden of proof at the preliminary examination on the charged crime, the court lacks authority to dismiss the charged crime and bind defendant over to stand trial on a lesser degree of the charged crime, all as more fully set forth in the opinion.
  • 4 [book] encuadernar, empastar
    More example sentences
    • Finally, the quires of pages are bound between two wooden covers and the spine is tied with damp leather.
    • The pages were then passed on to the next artist who worked on them and participants didn't see their work until the finished pages were bound into books.
    • She explains that she's bound the pages in red because to the Cherokee the colour symbolises wisdom through wounding.
  • 5 [Culin] ligar*, unir
    More example sentences
    • You may need to use a little bit of cold water to get it to bind together.
    • Set aside to cool, then stir in the egg whites to bind together.
    • Mix in the chopped spinach and spicy mushroom mix, then bind together with the egg white.

vi (past & past p bound)

Phrasal verbs

bind over

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
the judge had him bound over to the sheriff (AmE) quedó bajo la custodia del sheriff por disposición judicial they were bound over to keep the peace (BrE) quedaron bajo apercibimiento

bind up in

v + o + adv + prep + o (usu pass)
to be bound up in sth (absorbed, engrossed) estar* enfrascado en algo they are very bound up in each other están muy encerrados en su relación

bind up with

v + o + adv + prep + o (usu pass)
1.1 (dependent on) to be bound up with sth estar* estrechamente ligado or vinculado a algo 1.2bind up in

Definition of bind in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of bind in Spanish:

bind2

n

[colloquial/familiar]
  • 1.1 (difficult situation) aprieto (m), apuro (m) to be in a bind estar* en un aprieto or apuro, estar* metido en un lío [familiar/colloquial] to put sb in a bind poner* a algn en un aprieto or apuro
    More example sentences
    • Two months into his second term, he is in one of the toughest political binds of his presidency.
    • Russia is in a political bind of its own creation, specifically over the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty.
    • With accountability so popular, however, the unions and their allies found themselves in a political bind.
    1.2 (nuisance) (BrE) lata (f) [familiar/colloquial], plomo (m) [familiar/colloquial], rollo (m) (Esp) [familiar/colloquial] what a bind! ¡qué lata or plomo! [familiar/colloquial], ¡qué rollo! (Esp) [familiar/colloquial]
    More example sentences
    • The travel can be a bit of a bind but then you get days like one at Catterick recently when it was five-hour round trip for one ride - but it won!
    • Work is a bit of a bind at the mo ’, seem to be suffering from a bad case of post festive season wind up.
    • Seven days in a hotel can be a bit of a bind sometimes, but there is a feeling of excitement about this tour, a buzz: we all know something special is just around the corner.

Definition of bind in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.