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bittersweet

Pronunciation: /ˈbɪtərswiːt; ˈbɪtəswiːt/

Translation of bittersweet in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (in taste) agridulce; [chocolate] (American English/inglés norteamericano) amargo
    Example sentences
    • This slightly bitter-sweet drink is good for moisturizing your throat to relieve tickles and coughing, it also alleviates constipation.
    • We purchased some things there (including some of those bitter-sweet cola worms that sell all over the place in NZ) and headed back towards Brooklyn on the subway.
    • The berries add flavour to many foods and drinks besides gin - their bitter-sweet taste goes particularly well with stronger meats and game.
    1.2 [memories/feeling/ballad] agridulce
    Example sentences
    • The businessman said: ‘This is a bitter-sweet victory for us as I gain no pleasure from what I see as a complete waste of council-tax payers' money.’
    • Despite the bitter-sweet memories, the win remains the greatest moment in the central European country's sporting history and is still, 50 years on, a source of intense pride for Hungarians of all ages.
    • They even visit Canterbury on their way, but the tales they tell (mostly to us, not each other) are the bitter-sweet flashbacks of memory, not episodes of instructive fiction.

Definition of bittersweet in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The current Spanish Constitution (Constitución Española) was approved in the Cortes Generales in December 1978. It describes Spain as a parliamentary monarchy, gives sovereign power to the people through universal suffrage, recognizes the plurality of religions, and transfers responsibility for defense from the armed forces to the government. The Constitution was generally well received, except in the Basque Country, whose desire for independence it did not satisfy. It is considered to have facilitated the successful transition from dictatorship to democracy.