There are 2 translations of blight in Spanish:

blight1

Pronunciation: /blaɪt/

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 [Agriculture/Agricultura] [Horticulture/Horticultura] añublo (m); (loosely) peste (f)
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    • Corn seed is generally treated with fungicides to prevent seed decays and seedling blights.
    • We have lost too many champions to Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight, and oak wilt.
    • Then in 1845 the harvest was wrecked by bad weather, and the first blights hit the Irish potato crop.
    1.2 (curse) plaga (f), cáncer (m) urban blight los problemas de las zonas urbanas deprimidas her mother's death cast a blight on her childhood la muerte de su madre ensombreció su infancia
    More example sentences
    • Fascism is a gross deformity on the once awe inspiringly superlative face of this earth, and such blights so easily make otherwise beautiful spectacles the ugliest of things.
    • He has been credited with turning the country around after several severe economic blights and in recent years for spearheading the introduction of policies to boost the country's economic competitiveness.
    • Nowadays, anyone with access to graphics software can readily modify digital images to remove such blights as red eye in flash photos or transport themselves from a crowded room to a pristine beach.

Definition of blight in:

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The variety of catalán spoken in the Balearic Islands is called mallorquín. Some people regard it as a separate language from Catalan, which enjoys official status, but it is not officially recognized as such.

There are 2 translations of blight in Spanish:

blight2

vt

  • 1.1 [plant/crop] arruinar, infestar; [region] asolar
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    • Only when their crop of vines is blighted can they make Sauternes, one of the most glorious sweet wines in the world, which thrives on rot and fungal decay.
    • If there were witches, who could blight your crops, make you sterile, and turn you into a newt just by an incantation or two, then of course we should hunt them.
    • She could blight crops as easily as bless them, deliver at a difficult lambing and assist the occasional human birth for those too poor to have a more qualified attendant.
    More example sentences
    • In the worst of times, urban areas are blighted, deserted with depressed economies.
    • For after demolition became the answer to the 50 properties whose neglected condition had blighted the North Road area of Blackburn for almost a decade, it was decided to turn what had been an eyesore into a site to please the eye.
    • The latest Urban Renewal Scheme aims to build on progress achieved under previous schemes in combating the urban dereliction and decay which has blighted so many central areas of our towns and cities.
    1.2 [life/career/health] arruinar; [hopes] malograr, echar por tierra
    More example sentences
    • For returning officers across East Lancashire, one of the primary goals of next month's national and county council elections is to restore faith in a process blighted by scandal in recent years.
    • But Dudgeon's career at Oakwell was blighted by a bout of post-viral syndrome which prevented him from making a League appearance for the Tykes.
    • Tomorrow, we will destroy the evil blighting our land!

Definition of blight in:

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Word of the day moto
f
motorcycle …
Cultural fact of the day

The variety of catalán spoken in the Balearic Islands is called mallorquín. Some people regard it as a separate language from Catalan, which enjoys official status, but it is not officially recognized as such.