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caption

Pronunciation: /ˈkæpʃən/

Translation of caption in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (under picture) leyenda (feminine), pie (masculine) de foto ( or ilustración etc)
    Example sentences
    • Bournemouth Council now uses cartoon captions on its posters to attract attention.
    • The captions accompanying posters (which showed streams of bright sunlight through the clouds) were written in mock bible-speak.
    • Every key work is illustrated and accompanied by an explanatory caption.
    1.2 (headline) título (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Deeds, captions on cases, and other legal forms like subpoenas all serve the purpose of giving notice, which is how lawyers and the courts communicate with the public.
    • The case is notable not for the momentousness of the underlying legal question but for its amusing caption.
    • Defendants' motion to remove Kama's name from the caption of this case is ALLOWED.
    1.3 [Cinema/Cine] subtítulo (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • The film, punctuated by captions highlighting what the party considers key achievements, wasn't so much about setting out key pledges but setting a tone and feeling for Labour's protagonists.
    • To judge by the Estonian television captions, the first day of the Leaving Cert was marked by the coming together of two trade unions, EESTI and IIRIMAA.
    • And on the simplest level, there was a disconcerting clash between the postmodern textuality dispensed by the singers and the humble captions on the screen.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

Definition of caption in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.