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carbon

Pronunciation: /ˈkɑːrbən; ˈkɑːbən/

Translation of carbon in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable [Chemistry/Química] carbono (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Combustion, or burning, is a chemical process involving carbon, hydrogen and oxygen.
    • It is composed mostly of isotopes of hydrogen and helium and includes 60 other elements including neon, argon carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and iron.
    • Consider the top five constituents of the cosmos, in order of their abundance: hydrogen, helium, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen.
    1.2 countable/numerable [Electricity/Electricidad] carbón (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • The carbons last approximately 2 hours and then are replaced.
    • By the 1970's there was no longer a source for the 2 1/2 inch carbons that were required for this light.
  • 2 countable/numerable 2.1 (paper) carbon paper 2.2 (copy) carbon copy
    Example sentences
    • This was in the good old days when you drew your layouts on a massive piece of grid paper outfitted with a carbon layer so there were three copies.
    • All copies either had to be produced with carbons or on ‘skins’ fed through the temperamental duplicator.
    • If there is a carbon, also ask for that from the clerk and shred it when you go home.

Definition of carbon in:

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Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.