Translation of charcoal in Spanish:

charcoal

Pronunciation: /ˈtʃɑːrkəʊl; ˈtʃɑːkəʊl/

n

u
  • 1.1 carbón (m) (vegetal) 1.2 [Art] carboncillo (m), carbonilla (f) (RPl) (before n) charcoal drawing dibujo (m) al carboncillo or al carbón or (RPl tb) a la carbonilla
    More example sentences
    • They include such materials as soil, sand, rice flour, ash, white cement, charcoal or pigment, rubbed onto paper or canvas.
    • These 60 drawings show Picasso's work on paper with pencil, charcoal, ink and gouache.
    • Since then, Jayant has dabbled with oil on canvas, watercolour, charcoal, acrylic, clay and plaster of Paris.
    More example sentences
    • On view until October 29, the exhibit presents 55 of the 300 known watercolors, pastels and charcoals by the late artist - many of which have never been seen before.
    • His first two solo shows were a blizzard of styles, combining watercolours and charcoals, landscapes and portraits, and religious paintings crafted lovingly by a committed atheist.
    • If a visitor familiar with the charcoals had come in not knowing this was a show of Weiss's prints, it would have become apparent only when she or he came face to face with the central image in Thoughts, a lithograph.

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