Translation of chest in Spanish:

chest

Pronunciation: /tʃest/

n

  • 1 [Anat] pecho (m) to have a weak chest tener* problemas respiratorios to get sth off one's chest desahogarse* contando/confesando algo to play o keep one's cards close to one's chest no soltar* prenda [familiar/colloquial] (before n) chest cold catarro (m) de pecho chest pains dolores (mpl) de pecho chest specialist especialista (mf) de las vías respiratorias
    More example sentences
    • Gabriel removed his shirt, and I kissed his neck, his chest, his stomach, over and over again.
    • The water slowly went up to my knees, to my stomach, to my chest, to my neck.
    • A rash then appears in patches, usually behind the ears, under the arms, on the chest and stomach, and the arms and legs.
    More example sentences
    • And in the late evening I was bundled off to the Accident and Emergency department suffering from bad pains in the chest.
    • I would only be inflicting my germs all over you and giving you a bad chest.
    • The surface of the anterior chest wall and abdominal area were sterilized with ethanol.
  • 2 (box) arcón (m)
    More example sentences
    • On one side of the room there were a few boxes and chests of storage, but Josie didn't mind.
    • The storage chest was fairly easy, too, although it took a while to build because there were so many screws.
    • She removed several ammo clips from a storage chest and fitted them into her utility belt.
  • 3 (AmE) 3.1 (treasury) tesorería (f) 3.2 (funds) fondos (mpl)
    More example sentences
    • Banks have been asked to take over the currency chests which are at present managed by the various State Government treasuries.
    • She has not received that sum because she did not claim it, and therefore the Treasury chest has not been reduced by that amount.

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.