Share this entry

Share this page

citation

Pronunciation: /saɪˈteɪʃən/

Translation of citation in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 c and u (quotation) cita (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Not that the book lacks citations, references and footnotes.
    • The endnotes are primarily scholarly citations of sources, while the footnotes amplify, explain, or illuminate details or side stories.
    • In 1905, he published five landmark papers without footnotes or citations.
    1.2 countable/numerable (commendation) mención (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Those records include the official after-action report, citations for Bronze Stars awarded for heroism that day and now the Task Force 115 report.
    • He has received many citations and official commendations and published two volumes of collected poems he wrote.
    • The citation praises in particular the penthouse flat which it describes as a tour de force.
    Example sentences
    • The remainder of the story is best told in the citation accompanying the award of his Air Force Cross.
    • The citation accompanying the award said he was tasked with the disposal of two sea mines.
    • He read the citation accompanying the award and added his own praise.
    1.3 countable/numerable [Law/Derecho] citación (feminine) (judicial), emplazamiento (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • A citation requires a court appearance with the punishment and fine being determined by the judge upon conviction.
    • Indeed, he was told he would face a contempt of court citation if he disclosed either his complaint or the censure.
    • The police prosecutor has used it in court to look up the driving history of people who were appealing traffic citations.

Definition of citation in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day trocha
f
path …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.