Translation of cite in Spanish:

cite

Pronunciation: /saɪt/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (quote) citar, mencionar they closed the factory, citing lack of demand cerraron la fábrica alegando falta de demanda
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    • In scholarly literature, the number of times a journal article or a book is cited by other authors is regarded as an indicator of the relative influence or importance of the item.
    • This book was cited most frequently by the leading authors.
    • To answer that question, I want to cite a passage from the election statement of our party.
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    • And citing the examples I gave above, it's a doctrine with which I absolutely and completely disagree.
    • Besides, one should not be citing historical examples.
    • I'll stop citing examples now, else I'll most probably write a thesis.
    1.2 [Military/Militar] he was cited for bravery recibió una mención por su valor
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    • He played him in the centre of defence and cited the converted striker as one of the reasons that his side did not concede.
    • The report also singled out the school's family support worker for praise and cited her work as an exemplar for other schools.
    • So, should you be cited for heroism or indicted for homicide?
    1.3 [Law/Derecho] she was cited as corespondent in the divorce proceedings fue nombrada como segunda responsable en la demanda de divorcio
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    • She was cited, promised to appear at a March 27 court hearing in Malibu and then released about 1: 00 am on January 27.
    • In one month, 500 police officers were cited, 280 were called but only five gave evidence.
    • He was booked into jail, and he was cited for probable cause by the police that he may have committed an aggravated murder.

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el relevo de la guardia = the changing of the guard …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a ración is a serving of food eaten in a bar or cafe, generally with a drink. Friends or relatives meet in a bar or cafe, order a number of raciones, and share them. Raciones tend to be larger and more elaborate than tapas. They may be: Spanish omelet, squid, octopus, cheese, ham, or chorizo, among others.