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cognizance

Pronunciation: /ˈkɑːgnəzəns; ˈkɒgnɪzəns/
cognisance

Translation of cognizance in Spanish:

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (knowledge) [formal] conocimiento (masculine) to have cognizance of sth tener* conocimiento de algo please take cognizance of the fact that … pongo en su conocimiento que … [formal]
    Example sentences
    • The famous statement ‘unity of empty cognizance suffused with awareness’ refers to your own nature, the essence of your mind.
    • All of the lofty transcendental concepts that are in the higher worlds are meant to become a part of our experience and cognizance.
    • The smokers in the room were most appreciative of her cognisance of their plight!
    1.2 [Law/Derecho] competencia (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Most international human rights instruments subsequently adopted by the United Nations have a basis in the Universal Declaration and give further definition and cognisance to those rights.
    • The law takes no cognisance of carelessness in the abstract.
    • It is bound, of course, to give cognisance to the fact of the order that is being enforced.

Definition of cognizance in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.