Translation of comb in Spanish:

comb

Pronunciation: /kəʊm/

noun/nombre

  • 2 (act) (no plural/sin plural) your hair needs a good comb tienes que peinarte bien give your hair a quick comb pásate un peine, date una peinada (especially Latin America/especialmente América Latina)
    More example sentences
    • Giving my hair a quick comb through with my fingers I turned around to see that the door was open.
    • With a quick comb of her hair, and the applying of a light coat of make-up and a flowery fragrance, she was out the door.
    • I've taken to wearing baseball caps instead of having a slight comb in the morning.
  • 3 (for disentangling fibres) carda (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • If a comb was used, this would be to get the fibres parallel.
  • 4 (on bird) cresta (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Resplendent in bright orange, black and red, his comb, wattles and ear lobes have been shorn off.
    • Cracids may have a casque, hard comb, wattle or fleshy knob at the base of the bill.
    • As in other grouse species, red grouse combs are larger and brighter in males, and their size is testosterone-dependent.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1 1.1 (pass a comb through) to comb sb's hair peinar a algn to comb one's hair peinarse 1.2 [wool/cotton] peinar
  • 2 (search) [area/field] peinar, rastrear; [files/archives] rebuscar* ento comb sth for sth they combed the area for survivors/clues peinaron or rastrearon la zona en busca de supervivientes/ pistas I combed the newspaper for the story repasé el periódico de arriba abajo buscando el artículo

Definition of comb in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.