Translation of communion in Spanish:

communion

Pronunciation: /kəˈmjuːnjən/

n

  • 1 [Religion/Religión] 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (Eucharist)
    (Communion)
    Holy Communion la Santa or Sagrada Comunión to take Communion recibir la comunión or la eucaristía, comulgar* (before noun/delante del nombre) communion cup cáliz (masculine) communion rail comulgatorio (masculine) communion service comunión (feminine)
    1.2 countable/numerable (denomination) confesión (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • He courageously describes the discrimination and harm often visited upon one of Christianity's oldest communions - the Coptic Church.
    • This document still serves as a primary point of reference for Anglican dialogue with other Christian communions.
    • The advert says, ‘We are Christians, from different communions.’
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (exchange of ideas, fellowship) [formal] comunión (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • I am in exclusive intimate spiritual communion with each of my devotees.
    • The sheer joy of that intimate communion with nature; the contented peace we discover on the banks of running waters - that's what it's really all about.
    • Their imaginations are dominated by the ghosts of the past, in intimate communion with the shimmering world of the dead.
    More example sentences
    • This relation is not one of appropriation, possession, or passive representation of knowledge, but of communion and co-creative participation.
    • Mutual participation or communion is an integral feature of Christian salvation.
    • Making, breaking, and distributing bread carried profound connotations of friendship, communion, giving, sharing, justice.

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vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.