Translation of contagion in Spanish:

contagion

Pronunciation: /kənˈteɪdʒən/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 [Medicine/Medicina] contagio (masculine)
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    • All laws of quarantine have their origin and basis in the concept of disease transmission by contagion.
    • The confluence of invisibility, indeterminacy, and contagion understandably generates anxiety and encourages behaviour that reduces risk of exposure.
    • Secondly, trials using viral vectors occasionally present risks to the public through transmission of transgenes or contagion.
    More example sentences
    • Mortality rates dropped with the control of such contagions as smallpox, but tuberculosis continued to be a major problem that retarded population growth.
    • Not everyone in a city with a smallpox contagion is going to catch it, so the overall mortality for a population center would be less than that.
    • As a consequence, they would have come in contact with a vast array of other animals at the periphery of their habitat, which conceivably could have transferred a disease contagion to the great herds of the plains.
    1.2 [literary/literario] plaga (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • By the 1690s, Spinoza's ideas could be found in all the bookshops, and even polemics against him served only to spread the intellectual contagion.
    • The weeping spread like contagion to Amma and our maid.
    • I have fretted that some journalists might take it upon themselves to spread the vile contagion of conscience.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.