Translation of contraband in Spanish:

contraband

Pronunciation: /ˈkɑːntrəbænd; ˈkɒntrəbænd/

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (goods) contrabando (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • It means that if a policeman tries to use illegally obtained contraband as evidence to charge a suspect, the court will readily strike down such illicit evidence.
    • On the contrary, the moment a book becomes illegal contraband it is suddenly all the more desirable.
    • With legal imports in 1998 of $15 billion, contraband accounted for 25 percent of all imports.
    1.2 (smuggling) contrabando (masculine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [tobacco/alcohol] de contrabando
    More example sentences
    • It survived on contraband and piracy, trading cattle, hides, sugar, tobacco, and foodstuffs directly with other nations.
    • With caves, coves and beaches round the island, there was many a hiding place for smugglers, and contraband was a way of life on Portland - with even the man employed by the government to put a stop to the practice deeply involved.
    • But like drugs, and alcohol during Prohibition, black-market contraband always provides a means to acquire whatever is the forbidden fruit of the moment.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.