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convulse

Pronunciation: /kənˈvʌls/

Translation of convulse in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (contort) (usually passive/normalmente en voz pasiva) he was convulsed with pain se retorcía del dolor their antics convulsed the audience el público se desternillaba (de risa) con sus payasadas [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • Kristine tightened her muscles while her body convulsed.
    • Her body jerked and convulsed in pain and she fell backwards, dropping her sword with a clatter.
    • His words echoed in the emptiness of his mind as his frail, emaciated body began to convulse and was racked by involuntary spasms.
    1.2 (shake, rock) convulsionar, sacudir
    Example sentences
    • From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down I was convulsed with laughter.
    • She looked to the king and queen for support, but both were convulsed with laughter.
    • Please excuse the lack of in-depth analysis of this story, but it's hard to type when your entire body is convulsed with hysterical laughter.
    Example sentences
    • There are huge political and social upheavals that are convulsing the nation.
    • By 1983, protests against the dictatorship by social organizations and the banned political parties convulsed the country.
    • In September 1949, tens of millions hoped that the establishment of a Communist government in China would bring an end to the military and political turmoil that had convulsed the country for most of the first half of the twentieth century.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • the patient was convulsing el paciente tenía convulsiones

Definition of convulse in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.