Translation of coordinate in Spanish:

coordinate

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

/kəʊˈɔːrdneɪt; ˌkəʊˈɔːdɪneɪt/
  • 1 (make function together) [movements/activities/project] coordinar
    More example sentences
    • This option is, however, impractical for larger organizations where it is more cost effective to develop control rules as a means to coordinate the activities of organizational members.
    • This partnership has a key role in co-ordinating activities across public organisations, and it is through this group that transport issues affecting access to health care will be addressed.
    • A joint leadership group of officials from both organizations will coordinate these activities.
  • 3 [Linguistics/Lingüística] coordinar coordinating conjunction conjunción (feminine) coordinante

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

/kəʊˈɔːrdneɪt; ˌkəʊˈɔːdɪneɪt/
  • 1.1 [clothes/kitchenware] combinar, hacer* juego 1.2
    (coordinating present participle/participio presente)
    a gray suit with coordinating accessories un traje gris con accesorios haciendo juego or (in Spain also/en España también) con accesorios a juego

noun/nombre

/kəʊˈɔːrdnət; kəʊˈɔːdɪnət/
  • 2
    (coordinates plural)
    2.1 (in navigation) coordenadas (feminine plural) 2.2 (clothing) prendas (feminine plural) para combinar, coordinados (masculine plural)

adjective/adjetivo

/kəʊˈɔːdnət; kəʊˈɔːdɪnət/

Definition of coordinate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.