There are 2 translations of creep in Spanish:

creep1

Pronunciation: /kriːp/

vi (past & past p crept)

  • 1 (+ adv compl) 1.1 (crawl) arrastrarse the fox crept under the fence el zorro pasó arrastrándose por debajo de la cerca we crept along on all fours avanzamos a or en cuatro patas 1.2 (move stealthily) to creep into/out of a room entrar en/salir* de un cuarto sigilosamente I crept past the doorway pasé sigilosamente por delante de la puerta a note of suspicion crept into his voice se empezó a notar un elemento de sospecha en su voz several mistakes have crept in se han deslizado varios errores 1.3 (move slowly) the water crept higher el agua iba subiendo poco a poco prices continue to creep up los precios siguen subiendo lentamente despair crept over her la desesperación se fue apoderando de ella creeping inflation/unrest creciente inflación/malestar 1.4 (grow, spread) [plant/vine] trepar
    More example sentences
    • Branches and trunks twist and bend as they grow, creeping horizontally along the ground as well as reaching toward the sky.
    • This plant is happy to creep along the ground or to climb into trees and into hedges.
    • Because of the harsh environment, most plants that survive in the tundra are dwarfed, and many have stems that creep along the ground.
    More example sentences
    • Zoe's illness took her family by surprise and crept into their lives gradually.
    • Sometimes that cold creeps in gradually and the end result is pneumonia or even a heart attack.
    • That was before errors really crept into their game to deny them two points.
    More example sentences
    • The idea is that the risks are lower because your investment creeps up in value more steadily over the years.
    • Fixed rates started creeping up at the end of last summer in anticipation of increases in the base rate.
    • So, the blue line creeps up as the value of your gift increases.
    More example sentences
    • Sometimes, when Josie knew know no one would notice, she'd creep downstairs to the kitchen as quiet as a mouse and tiptoe out the back door when the cook wasn't looking.
    • As Jack slowly crept forward he heard a soft buzzing off in the corner.
    • After signaling everyone to stay outside, I carefully crept back into my room where I heard them discussing, yet again, me.
    More example sentences
    • At some points the cave walls crept slowly closer to the path we walked, before steering away again into the distance.
    • As the morning slowly crept forward, more and more things began to stir.
    • The bus crept slowly through the viscous traffic pouring into the city.

Phrasal verbs

creep up on

v + adv + prep + o
they crept up on him se le acercaron sigilosamente old age creeps up on you vas envejeciendo sin darte cuenta the deadline's creeping up on us se nos está acabando el plazo

Definition of creep in:

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.

There are 2 translations of creep in Spanish:

creep2

n

  • 2 (BrE) [Auto] vehículo (m) lento (before n) creep lane carril (m) para vehículos lentos
  • 3
    (creeps pl)
    [colloquial/familiar] to give sb the creeps ponerle* los pelos de punta a algn [familiar/colloquial], darle* escalofríos a algn
    More example sentences
    • I guess some people thought I was a creep, offering sycophantic praise of someone who happens to be my boss.

Definition of creep in:

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.