There are 2 translations of cry in Spanish:

cry1

Pronunciation: /kraɪ/

n (plural cries)

  • 1 countable/numerable 1.1 (exclamation) grito (masculine) to give/let out a cry dar*/soltar* un grito there was a cry of 'man overboard!' se oyó un grito de '¡hombre al agua!' she heard cries for help oyó gritos de socorro her suicide attempt was a cry for help su intento de suicidio fue una llamada or un grito or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) un llamado de socorro to be a far cry from sth ser* muy distinto de or a algo
    More example sentences
    • Impassioned cries of: ‘We will shed blood to save the Datta Peetha’ were raised.
    • It was like you see in the films - you hear the whistle and the bang, there's a cry of ‘incoming’ and everybody gets down on the ground.
    • It's the hub of village life and when you go there at night, expect some of the elderly worse-for-wear locals to greet you with cries of ‘Hello, my brother’ when they discover you're Irish.
    1.2 (of street vendor) pregón (masculine) the cries of the newsboys los gritos de los vendedores de diarios
    More example sentences
    • In the weavers' cottage, weavers would be hard at work, and the streets thronged with people, where visitors would hear the cries of street traders selling their wares.
    • Despite the lights and the trains and the noise, it is quite easy to imagine the cries of the hawkers in a different age.
    • Visitors are battered by a cacophony of cries by hawkers trying to flog a variety of the ubiquitous plastic trinkets and squeaking toys.
    1.3 (no plural/sin plural) (call — of seagull) chillido (m), reclamo (m); (— of hounds) aullido (m) to be in full cry the press were in full cry, demanding his resignation la prensa pedía a gritos su dimisión
    More example sentences
    • Imagining their hoots to be the cry of some dangerous animal, she had spent nearly two terrified days on the run from her rescuers.
    • The cries of topical birds and animals could be heard very clearly in the night air.
    • Whistles and cries came from the birds as they continued forward.
  • 2 (weep) [colloquial/familiar] (no plural/sin plural) llanto (masculine) to have a cry llorar you'll feel better after a good cry te sentirás mejor después de un buen llanto
    More example sentences
    • He took an awful long time coming back, because he had to keep stopping to have a cry!
    • I have a cry while I slice the onions.
    • I put my arms down on the computer desk, and leaned my head down on them to have a cry.
  • 3 (slogan) lema (m), slogan (m)
    More example sentences
    • Soon, international opinion took up the cry and the authorities reacted quickly.
    • The match also almost certainly ended the cry from fans demanding a return to Sunday action.
    • The most frequent cry is to demand the whereabouts of the powerful foreign reporting that they remember from the 1960s.

Definition of cry in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of cry in Spanish:

cry2

vi (cries, crying, cried)

  • 1 (weep) llorar to make sb cry hacer* llorar a algn we laughed till we cried nos reímos hasta que se nos saltaron las lágrimas I could have cried for joy/with frustration hubiera llorado de alegría/frustración to cry for sb llorar por algn I'll give you something to cry about o for! ¡yo te voy a dar motivo para que llores!
    More example sentences
    • Woman were crying with tears of joy as men swung their children around before giving them a smothering bear hug.
    • Now as he sat in his chair thinking about his oldest daughter, he remembered that not even in the hospital did she cry - not one tear was shed.
    • It was considered good to cry so tears were frequently shed in public by both men and women.
  • 2 (call) [bird] chillar; [person] gritar they cried for help pidieron ayuda a gritos for crying out loud! [colloquial/familiar] ¡por el amor de Dios!
    More example sentences
    • Feet could be heard pounding down the steps to his quarters and a voice cried out, ‘Maurice!’
    • Suddenly a voice cried out to her in this manner: Get up quickly!
    • And saying this he cried out with a great voice: Lazarus, come out here.
    More example sentences
    • In the little trading towns, the traders sat in their shops, far too weary to cry their wares.
    • Merchants were crying out their wares in the morning air, each straining to make their voices heard over the music and laughter.
    • Store owners and merchants were crying out their wares or conducting business.
    More example sentences
    • The bird cried out, thrashing its wings.
    • The bird cried out and thunder echoed back from the sky.
    • One day, a resident chimp cried out, signaling that snakes were present.

vt (cries, crying, cried)

  • 1 (weep) llorar he cried himself to sleep lloró hasta quedarse dormido

Phrasal verbs

cry down

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
menospreciar, quitarle méritos a

cry off

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (especially British English/especialmente inglés británico)
echarse atrás he had agreed to the interview, but cried off when … había aceptado que lo entrevistaran pero se echó atrás cuando … several of the guests cried off at the last minute a último momento varios de los invitados dijeron que no podían venir

cry out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
1.1 (call out) gritar he cried out to them to come back les gritó que volvieran 1.2 (need) to cry out for sth pedir* algo a gritos

cry up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento

Definition of cry in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.