Translation of detoxification in Spanish:

detoxification

Pronunciation: /diːˌtɑːksəfəˈkeɪʃən; diːˌtɒksɪfɪˈkeɪʃən/

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (of addict) desintoxicación (feminine); (before noun/delante del nombre) [unit/center] de desintoxicación
    More example sentences
    • One study involves a medication trial of buprenorphine as a detoxification treatment for heroin addiction.
    • Women who used prior mental health services are more likely to use additional drug treatment modalities beyond detoxification.
    • Among women, those in the labor force were more likely to have been in drug treatment or detoxification.
    1.2 (of substance) eliminación (feminine) de la toxicidad
    More example sentences
    • Whereas the traditional process of detoxification was limited to the removal of the toxic substance from the system, this is only a small part of the aims of the modern detox.
    • Documented functions of HBs include storage and transport of oxygen, nitric oxide detoxification, and facilitating oxygen diffusion in symbiotic tissues.
    • By applying unique pressures to the ten zones of the feet, the body returns to a state of balance and well being, improving blood circulation and aiding the process of detoxification.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.