Translation of difficult in Spanish:

difficult

Pronunciation: /ˈdɪfɪkəlt/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 1.1 (not easy) [task/problem] difícil the difficult bit o part is … lo difícil es …, la dificultad está en … he's finding it difficult to give up smoking le está resultando difícil dejar de fumar, le está costando dejar de fumar it is difficult to know whom to believe es difícil saber a quién creerle we'll make things very difficult for him le haremos la vida imposible you're a difficult man to get hold of! ¡mira que es difícil dar contigo!
    More example sentences
    • We all acknowledged the fact that this decision is very difficult for you to understand.
    • It is as difficult for us to understand adolescents as it is for them to understand us.
    • It is very difficult for me to disagree with the statement that they deplore it.
    1.2 (unfavorable) [times/circumstances/phase] difícil
    More example sentences
    • The State of Oregon is looking hard to save where it can in this difficult business climate.
    • I was also a union steward at that time involved in long and difficult negotiations.
    • The whole situation is made more difficult by the complexity of the cost equations.
    More example sentences
    • It's quite a hard thing to say, but my Nan is a very difficult person for me to be around.
    • My character in the film had a very difficult father and there was one scene in which she had to stand up to him.
    • He has succeeded in showing us that he is a difficult man, but that needed no great mastery.
  • 2 (awkward) [person/personality] difícil he's difficult to live with es difícil convivir con él she's just trying to be difficult lo único que quiere es causar problemas

Definition of difficult in:

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Word of the day sigla
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abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.