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dint
American English: /dɪnt/
British English: /dɪnt/

noun

  • 1by dint of something
    a fuerza de algo
    he won it by dint of sheer hard work
    se lo ganó a fuerza de trabajar
    se lo ganó a pulso
    Example sentences
    • Creative work is done not by dint of will power, by some kind of mental exertion; instead, and paradoxically, it comes with the least effort, out of the blue.
    • She reaches this position by dint of sheer competence.
    • But one day by dint of sheer chance and perverse good luck Vernon happened to be struck by a rather smashing train of thought.
  • 2 (American English) dent
    Example sentences
    • The hat, I think the style was called fedora, had a dark band and a dint in the top, which my father would sometimes correct with a chopping action of his right hand.
    • Remove dints and scratches and chips from cars; detail your car inside and out and respray the car, for $1000.
    • I'm not sure my massive century-old wardrobe can handle any more nicks and dints from ‘careful’ removalists.

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    Cultural fact of the day

    ESO (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria) is one of the stages of secondary education established in Spain by the LOE - Ley Orgánica de Educación (2006). It begins at twelve years of age and ends at sixteen, the age at which compulsory education ends. The old division between a technical and an academic education is not as marked in ESO, as all secondary pupils receive basic professional training.