Share this entry

Share this page

directorate

Pronunciation: /dəˈrektərət; daɪ-; daɪˈrektərət; dɪ-/

Translation of directorate in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 (board of directors) (+ singular or plural verb/+ verbo en singular o plural) dirección (feminine), directiva (feminine), consejo (masculine) de administración, junta (feminine) directiva
    Example sentences
    • Such companies developed elected directorates to enforce their rules, deal with disputes amongst their members, and negotiate with outsiders.
    • Prior research on interlocking directorates has focused on how overlapping board memberships can promote mimetic isomorphism in a population by facilitating the diffusion of individual policies and structures between firms.
    • In addition, we also controlled for board centrality in the network of interlocking directorates, measured as the natural log of the total number of non-duplicated ties between the focal board and all other boards in the larger sample.
  • 2 (especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) directorship

Definition of directorate in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day llanero
m,f
plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.