There are 2 translations of ease in Spanish:

ease1

Pronunciation: /iːz/

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1 (facility) facilidad (feminine) ease of operation/reference facilidad de manejo/consulta for ease of access para facilitar el acceso with ease fácilmente, con facilidad the graceful ease with which he moved la gracia y soltura con que se movía
    More example sentences
    • Presented with a gilt-edged chance, Gardyne attempted to lift his shot over Craig Wight, but the goalkeeper caught the effort with ease.
    • Women retained their rights to manage their own money and property after marriage and could obtain a divorce with the same ease - or difficulty - as a man.
    • How has the final sound mixing gone in terms of difficulty or ease?
  • 2 2.1 (freedom from constraint) I never feel at ease with her con ella nunca siento que me puedo relajar or nunca me siento a mis anchas I feel more at ease in casual clothes me siento más cómodo or más a gusto vestido de sport he knows how to put interviewees at their ease sabe hacer relajar al entrevistado to put/set sb's mind at ease tranquilizar* a algn 2.2 [Military/Militar] (stand) at ease! ¡descansen!, ¡en descanso!
  • 3 (leisure) he was used to a life of ease estaba acostumbrado a la buena vida or a una vida desahogada to take one's ease [literary/literario] reposar [formal]

Definition of ease in:

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Word of the day juerga
f
partying …
Cultural fact of the day

Bullfighting is popular in Spain and in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. For some Spaniards it is crucial to Spanish identity. The season runs from March to October in Spain, from November to March in Latin America.

There are 2 translations of ease in Spanish:

ease2

vt

  • 1 1.1 [pain] calmar, aliviar; [tension] hacer* disminuir, aliviar; [burden] aligerar to ease sb's mind tranquilizar* a algn he did it to ease his conscience lo hizo para descargarse la conciencia they eased me of a couple of hundred dollars [humorous/humorístico] me aligeraron de unos doscientos dólares [humorous/humorístico] 1.2 [situation] paliar, mejorar; [transition] facilitar a bridge would ease the traffic flow un puente descongestionaría or haría más fluida la circulación del tráfico to ease the way for sb allanarle el camino a algn
    More example sentences
    • Behind the slick new steel and glass facades, what can you expect in the way of facilities to ease the MBA learning experience?
    • The same materials are expected to be used in the larger extension, which will have a conveyor link to the existing facility to ease the transfer of airfreight.
    • He urged Government to prioritise the provision of facilities that would ease the education and employment access of the blind.
  • 2 2.1 [rules/restrictions] relajar 2.2 [belt/rope] aflojar
    More example sentences
    • The ship ran aground for three minutes before it was eased off.
    More example sentences
    • The process will test his ability to make good on his promises to use rail to ease Westside traffic congestion.
    • He said network congestion would be eased in Windhoek with the opening of additional base stations.
    • The U.S. boom has softened a bit lately, easing some of the pressure on central bankers in both countries to hurry up and raise rates.
  • 3 (move with care) (+ adverb complement/+ adverbio predicativo) they eased him into the wheelchair lo sentaron con cuidado en la silla de ruedas he eased on his jacket se puso la chaqueta con cuidado
    More example sentences
    • Murmuring soft words of comfort and nonsense, she eased herself carefully along the wall, bringing her hand along the side of the horse.
    • Carefully, she eased over across the floor to the door, then moving as fast as she could, she swung it open.
    • Balancing the car on the throttle and I eased myself around for a couple of laps to familiarise myself with the setup.

vi

  • 1.1 [pain] aliviarse, calmarse; [tension] disminuir*, decrecer* 1.2 [interest rate/prices] disminuir*, bajar
    More example sentences
    • House price inflation needs to ease to a rate of 6 per cent if a disorderly correction is to be avoided.
    • The report came amid improving macroeconomic indicators as inflation has eased, interest rates are down and the rupiah has strengthened.
    • They feel that though interest rates should ease, banks may not be in a position to slash their lending rates.
    1.3 [restriction] relajarse
    More example sentences
    • ‘When I get tense, I see the funny side and begin to laugh and then the tension eases,’ he explains.
    • Then the sadness and shame began to ease, and I realised that they were not productive feelings.
    • Tensions eased with each passing moment and the three friends began joking with each other.

Phrasal verbs

ease off

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio 1.1 (become less severe) [rain] amainar; [fever] bajar; [pain] aliviarse, calmarse; [pressure/traffic] disminuir*; [tension] disminuir*, decrecer* things have eased off a little at work las cosas se han calmado un poco en el trabajo 1.2 (act more moderately) he'll be dead before he's forty if he doesn't ease off no va a llegar a los cuarenta si sigue trabajando así or si no se toma las cosas con más calma ease off, Jim; he's only a youngster tranquilo Jim, no es más que un chico 1.3ease up 2 1.1verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento [colloquial/familiar] 2.1 (be less severe with) ease off the criticism a little no critiques tanto ease off him or you'll break his arm! ¡déjalo ya, que le vas a romper el brazo! 2.2 [accelerator/brake] soltar*, aflojarle a [colloquial/familiar]

ease up

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
1.1 (relax) you ought to ease up at your age a tu edad deberías tomarte las cosas con más calma if we ease up now, we'll never get back on schedule si bajamos el ritmo ahora, nunca nos pondremos al día 1.2 (slow down) disminuir* la velocidad, aminorar la marcha

Definition of ease in:

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Word of the day juerga
f
partying …
Cultural fact of the day

Bullfighting is popular in Spain and in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. For some Spaniards it is crucial to Spanish identity. The season runs from March to October in Spain, from November to March in Latin America.