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enormity

Pronunciation: /ɪˈnɔːrməti; ɪˈnɔːməti/

Translation of enormity in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural -ties)

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (wickedness) enormidad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The full enormity of the tragedy has now emerged, and large sums of money have been pledged.
    • This because the horror, the scale, the quantitative enormity and ‘serial’ nature of the crimes had exceeded any individual legal responsibility.
    • Even as the full enormity of the attack continued to sink in, Nato and the UN Security Council were falling in behind the US line.
    1.2 countable/numerable (crime) atrocidad (feminine), barbaridad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • There is no doubt that the person to be tried committed criminal enormities.
    • Such bloodstained enormities pass unnoticed now in a media pummelled into numbness by a government at last bereft of any moral sense or shame.
    • Before the human and financial enormities of that conflict, leaders and citizens assumed that wars were what countries did.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (great size) enormidad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The Government has not grasped the full enormity of what is happening to this industry.
    • With the multi-million euro shopping centre at its Shandon location now in full swing the enormity of its benefit to the overall economy of the town can hardly be overstated.
    • At this stage I have not had the opportunity to review the draft plan at the Council chambers so do not know the full enormity of the plan.

Definition of enormity in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales