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epicene

Pronunciation: /ˈepəsiːn; ˈepɪsiːn/

Translation of epicene in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [Linguistics/Lingüística] epiceno 1.2 (effeminate) [literary/literario] afeminado
    Example sentences
    • He had an epicene beauty and his iconic character was the ‘thing in itself,’ comedy and pathos in the same figure.
    • He was also a eunuch of such beauty that the sultan fell for his epicene handsomeness and appointed him his senior commander.
    • For someone who has spent much of his life perfecting an image of epicene other-worldliness, he now bears startlingly normal hallmarks of a bloke you'd enjoy talking to down the pub.
    Example sentences
    • In this movie though, it's formed out of an epicene husband and a working-class orphan who have cemented their bonds in her absence, in a tent on an overnighter in the dark forest, to the tune of hooting owls.
    • Among my favorites are the triumphant warrior Fortinbras represented by a pair of barefoot drips in angel costume, he blond and epicene, she a redheaded virago.
    • Their gestures, facial expressions, and vocal intonations render them stereotypically gay or epicene.

Definition of epicene in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.