Translation of episode in Spanish:

episode

Pronunciation: /ˈepəsəʊd; ˈepɪsəʊd/

n

  • 1.1 (of story, TV serial) episodio (m), capítulo (m)
    More example sentences
    • In seven years they wrote 103 radio episodes and 63 television shows.
    • Whilst listening to an episode of Radio 4's programme Growing Science, I came across a word I hadn't heard before - thigmomorphogenesis.
    • My restaurant was used by BBC TV to shoot television plays and an episode of a serial was made there.
    1.2 (event) episodio (masculine) he denied the whole episode negó toda la historia
    More example sentences
    • In any event, the whole episode has given rise to the same mercantilist arguments that have always been used to justify tariffs.
    • If we take it at face value, the whole episode was a terrible accident, but the way the police have handled the aftermath has perhaps done them more harm than good.
    • Regardless of the outcome of the trial, the whole episode has been a huge embarrassment to English football.
    1.3 [Literature/Literatura] episodio (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • This was only the most dramatic episode in an unfolding tragedy.
    • His ‘Homeric Ballads’, versified episodes from the Odyssey told in brisk, headlong style, were for Fraser's.
    • Plato illustrates the intellectual advantage that Socrates has over Protagoras in the episode of Simonides's poem.
    1.4 [Music/Música] pasaje (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • I found myself visibly moved during the central subject's climactic high string episodes; likewise during the close of the development.
    • Fugue and episodes flow in and out of one another seamlessly.
    • Most of the episodes (excepting a very Stravinskian idea of an upward-thrusting minor third) seem related to the main theme.

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.