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explosion

Pronunciation: /ɪkˈspləʊʒən/

Translation of explosion in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (of bomb, gas) explosión (feminine), estallido (masculine) a loud explosion una fuerte explosión
    Example sentences
    • A medic had found her on the platform near one of the commuter trains that had been ripped apart by twin bomb explosions.
    • The peace in the town was shattered by the explosion, which blew out doors and windows and sprayed glass across the street.
    • In the northern province, a bomb explosion damaged an oil pipeline.
    Example sentences
    • The researchers also plan to measure the speed of the explosion's shock wave to get further data.
    • When massive stars die, most of their energy is released as neutrinos in violent supernova explosions.
    • They carry a large fraction of the kinetic energy of the explosions of very massive stars.
    1.2 (of anger) estallido (masculine), explosión (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Finding oneself faced by danger, difficulties, sudden outburst or an explosion of anger, one shouldn't react quickly.
    • Jason couldn't understand her sudden explosion of anger and he knew there had to be more to what was bothering her than the spider prank.
    • Described as powerful, domineering and charismatic, he alternated affection with explosions of anger that terrified children and staff.
    1.3 (increase) a population explosion una explosión demográfica there has been a price explosion los precios se han disparado

Definition of explosion in:

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