Share this entry

Share this page

fart

Pronunciation: /fɑːrt; fɑːt/

Translation of fart in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (gas) [vulgar] pedo (masculine) [colloquial/familiar] 1.2 (person) [slang/argot] a boring old fart un pesado de mierda [vulgar]
    Example sentences
    • We know also that farts are warm (not hot), so I'll add that: a fart is warm wind emitted from the anus.
    • Nature decided to put an abrupt end to our finger-pointing conspiracy theorists' dialogue, when a deafening fart emptied from the anus of someone soundly asleep downstairs.
    • If I can remember what I learned in junior high school regarding tornadoes, they're some kind of thing which is made up of wind, like a fart but only much more powerful.
    Example sentences
    • I'm a boring old fart, who values her money, and won't buy him a brand new shirt to chop holes in so he can look like a pirate.
    • I'm being a boring old fart so I'm in my room getting ready to go to bed.
    • On television, there was some boring old fart in a suit talking about the dangers of credit growth.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [vulgar] tirarse or echarse un pedo [colloquial/familiar], pedorrearse [colloquial/familiar]

Phrasal verbs

fart around

(especially British English/especialmente inglés británico) fart about verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
[slang/argot] perder* el tiempo

Definition of fart in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day trocha
f
path …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.