Translation of fixed in Spanish:

fixed

Pronunciation: /fɪkst/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 1.1 (unchanging) [price/rate/premium] fijo; [principles/position/view] rígido a man of fixed ideas un hombre de ideas fijas of no fixed abode [Law/Derecho] sin domicilio fijo
    More example sentences
    • It is not for this column to enter the political debate over ID cards - the Government evidently has its own fixed view of their value, consultations notwithstanding.
    • We also want to send visitors who come up with a fixed view of Highlands culture away happy.
    • He was a consummate pragmatist, but he was guided by fixed views.
    1.2 (prearranged) [date/time] fijado a fixed-term contract un contrato a plazo fijo a fixed-price contract un contrato a tanto alzado
    More example sentences
    • ‘With the markets having calmed down and with fixed rates fairly highly priced, borrowers are looking more at discounts or trackers,’ she said.
    • These mortgages are primarily priced at a fixed rate.
    • And some continental countries have still had house price booms despite fixed rates.
  • 2 (steady, unmoving) [gaze/attention] fijo; [smile/expression] petrificado
    More example sentences
    • As the tape finished, the light flicked back on again, leaving me staring at my own reflection once more, my fixed expression registering even more stunned shock than before.
    • But because Mia was their first child, they assumed the fixed expression on her face was normal for a newborn baby.
    • It is then that they noticed that his eyes have a fixed expression, then when they saw him open the book in hand and move his fingers across to read the Braille and laugh to himself.
  • 3 (provided with) [colloquial/familiar] how are you fixed for money/time/food? ¿qué tal andas or estás de dinero/tiempo/comida? [colloquial/familiar] my husband left me comfortably fixed for money mi marido me dejó en posición acomodada

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Word of the day sigla
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.