Translation of flourish in Spanish:

flourish

Pronunciation: /ˈflɜːrɪʃ; ˈflʌrɪʃ/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [arts/trade] florecer*; [business] prosperar; [plant] darse* or crecer* bien the children are flourishing los niños están creciendo sanos y saludables
    More example sentences
    • In the summer months it smelled of warm spices and sweet lavender from the growing gardens where the plants flourished and blossomed.
    • What kind of first year it experiences in a new territory can make the difference between an invading species of mushroom flourishing or failing.
    • Years later people still say to the daughter that the plant is flourishing.
    More example sentences
    • Buddhism itself, however, continues to flourish, having successfully responded to the challenge of colonialism and adapted to modern democracy.
    • For basketball to flourish yet more successfully in England it had to develop a solid infrastructure, said Nelson.
    • It was a time of rapid economic growth for the new country and the university flourished and rapidly expanded.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • [stick/letter] blandir, agitar
    More example sentences
    • The opening story, Celia, is a cheerless piece about a woman who will go to bed with anyone who flourishes a bottle.
    • At the same time he opened them to a procession of shonks, one of whom went around the world flourishing a letter signed by Cairns authorising him to raise funds for the Australian government.
    • Now the water was up to his chest and his right arm flourished the vodka bottle over his head.

noun/nombre

Definition of flourish in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.