Translation of fond in Spanish:

fond

Pronunciation: /fɑːnd; fɒnd/

adjective/adjetivo (-er, -est)

  • 1 (predicative/predicativo)fond of sb/sth/-ing she's very fond of Sue le tiene mucho cariño a Sue, quiere mucho a Sue he was fond of chocolate le gustaba el chocolate he's a bit too fond of criticizing other people es demasiado aficionado a criticar a los demás to grow fond of sb tomarle cariño a algn, encariñarse con algn
    More example sentences
    • The dead, as he is very fond of saying, don't care.
    • She had grown rather fond of the European drink and found it to be relaxing to sit and sip.
    • But over the years as he matured, she grew quite fond of him.
  • 2 (before noun/delante del nombre) 2.1 (loving) [gesture/look] cariñoso they were locked in a fond embrace estaban tiernamente abrazados with fondest regards con mi más sincero afecto 2.2 (indulgent) [parent/husband] demasiado complaciente
    More example sentences
    • Do you have any especially fond memories of those times that you might share?
    • He served from 1929 to 1955, leaving behind a legacy of material treasures as well as fond memories.
    • Believe it or don't, but Levine seems to have some pretty fond memories from his visits.
    2.3 (delusive, vain) [hope/illusion] vano
    More example sentences
    • That fond hope never materialised and there was no reason to suppose it would.
    • Even in defeat, he sees success and vows to contest again with the fond hope that he will emerge a victor one day.
    • In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation.

Definition of fond in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.