Translation of fume in Spanish:

fume

Pronunciation: /fjuːm/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1 (smoke) [Chemistry/Química] despedir* gases
    More example sentences
    • It was sounding like a scratched holodisc right now and smoke was fuming out of it's light receptor.
    • Smoke fumed out from the hood and it looked like that something blew up.
    • Birds, generally, will not tolerate human beings, especially human beings with gigantic clumsy flying machines that fume with black smoke and sound like a flying earthquake.
  • 2 (be angry) [colloquial/familiar] she was absolutely fuming estaba que echaba humo or chispas or que bufaba [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Of course there have been times when I have fumed at the end of the phone line when some official gave me an answer I didn't like but as I get older I realise that sometimes the answer has to be ‘No’.
    • Motorists fumed at the blocked roads, rail travellers found many services severely hit and the RAC demanded a public inquiry into the nation's resources for coping with emergency conditions.
    • Residents of the David Murray John Tower fumed at being left out in the cold for an hour after a second 30-year-old lift failed and security guards said they could not allow them to use the stairs.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.