Translation of gangway in Spanish:

gangway

Pronunciation: /ˈgæŋweɪ/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (walkway — on ship) pasarela (feminine); (— on building site) pasarela (feminine) gangway! ¡abran paso!
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    • As they dig amid the rubble, recovery workers are uncovering corridors and gangways that lead to the cavernous vaults below.
    • On 2 July 1994 a 6-year-old boy fell off a gangway leading to a viewing platform on a New Zealand Rail train.
    • Because shadows on the riverbed can disrupt underwater ecology, the gangways and above-surface portions of the pool wall may be made of Plexiglas.
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    • Local interest was further evident when the ship opened her gangway to the public.
    • However, the metal gangway which joined ship to shore was badly damaged and cadets have been busy repairing it.
    • The ship's company, resplendent in white, marched onboard and cheered ship, before CMDR Sammut was piped across the gangway for the first time.
  • 2 (between rows of seats) (British English/inglés británico) pasillo (masculine)
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    • The action takes place on an express train and a special set giving the impression of interior coaches was erected in the gangway of the theatre, with the audience seated on either side.
    • By late 1945, when I was transferred to the North Atlantic route, the Liberator had elementary heating and two rows of seats with a central gangway, but still no steward.
    • None of which saved me from a hand down my trousers after I was hauled aside for a random check on the gangway leading to the aircraft.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.