Translation of goodness in Spanish:

goodness

Pronunciation: /ˈgʊdnəs; ˈgʊdnɪs/

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1 1.1 (moral worth) bondad (feminine) he did it out of the goodness of his heart lo hizo de lo bondadoso or bueno que es
    More example sentences
    • Hope draws its power from a deep trust in higher being and the basic goodness of human nature
    • Basic goodness transcends the concepts of good and bad.
    • But along with my innocent childhood belief in the resurrection of rock music and the essential goodness of mankind, this myth was shattered too.
    1.2 (of food) valor (masculine) nutritivo canned food loses a lot of its goodness los alimentos enlatados pierden gran parte de su valor nutritivo
    More example sentences
    • Some of them even went so far as to ingest tape worms to avoid their bodies absorbing the goodness from food and so remaining thin (some people today still do this).
    • The food nourishes, provides nutrients and goodness, yet the left-overs are generally uniform and of a recurring theme.
    • At least, not now, with the goodness and warmth of the food spreading within him.
  • 2 (in interjectional phrases/en locuciones de tipo interjección) (as intensifier) (my) goodness! ¡Dios (mío)! goodness me/gracious! ¡Dios mío!, ¡válgame Dios! how long will it take? — goodness (only) knows! ¿cuánto tiempo tardará? — ¡vaya usted a saber! goodness knows, I only wanted to help Dios sabe que solo quería ayudar I hope to goodness he'll be all right ojalá or Dios quiera que no le pase nada surely to goodness you're not going like that? ¡válgame Dios! no irás a ir así ¿no? sake1 3

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.