There are 2 translations of gossip in Spanish:

gossip1

Pronunciation: /ˈgɑːsəp; ˈgɒsɪp/

n

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (speculation, scandal) chismorreo (masculine) [colloquial/familiar], cotilleo (masculine) (Spain/España) [colloquial/familiar] she gave me all the latest gossip me puso al día con los chismes [colloquial/familiar] it's just idle gossip solo son habladurías it gave rise to a lot of gossip in the office dio mucho que hablar en la oficina an interesting piece of gossip un chisme interesante (before noun/delante del nombre) gossip column crónica (feminine) de sociedad gossip columnist cronista (masculine and feminine) de sociedad 1.2 countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable (chat) to have a gossip with sb chismorrear [colloquial/familiar] or (in Spain also/en España también) cotillear con algn 1.3 countable/numerable (person) chismoso, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar], cotilla (masculine and feminine) (Spain/España) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • However, members of the public reading the caption would think it was true and that the gossip he reported was accurate.
    • It's still uncertain if the damaging gossip is true, but if it were, I would only respect Sharon that much more!
    • It all became as terrible as completely true gossip would be.
    More example sentences
    • Radcliffe had always enjoyed a good gossip about the latest rumours on the circuit and was quite happy to share them with writers who had followed her since she was a teenager.
    • Yeah, here comes the annoying whispers and gossips.
    • She appears here as a more amiable figure, fond of a good gossip, and with an endless fund of stories.
    More example sentences
    • He was, incongruously, an incurable gossip, careful to label rumour for what it was, but fascinated by it…
    • The first gossips were Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
    • The government encourages village snoops and urban gossips to volunteer their infinite time and darkest thoughts as a way of keeping the rest of us in line.

Definition of gossip in:

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Word of the day madeja
f
hank …
Cultural fact of the day

The CAP (Curso de Adaptación Pedagógica) is a course taken in Spain by graduates with degrees in subjects other than education, who want to teach at secondary level. Students take a CAP in a particular subject, such as mathematics, literature, etc.

There are 2 translations of gossip in Spanish:

gossip2

vi

Definition of gossip in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day madeja
f
hank …
Cultural fact of the day

The CAP (Curso de Adaptación Pedagógica) is a course taken in Spain by graduates with degrees in subjects other than education, who want to teach at secondary level. Students take a CAP in a particular subject, such as mathematics, literature, etc.