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gown

Pronunciation: /gaʊn/

Translation of gown in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 (dress) vestido (masculine) evening/wedding gown traje (masculine) de fiesta/novia baptismal o christening gown faldón (masculine) bautismal
    Example sentences
    • Many cruises still offer one or more optional formal dinners where ladies where long formal gowns or other evening dresses and gentlemen wear tuxedos or dark suits.
    • All around there were hundreds of dresses and gowns for all occasions hanging upon the walls.
    • They dressed in their finest gowns of silk and satin, jewels of gold, elegant shoes and shawls.
    1.2
    (nightgown)
    (American English/inglés norteamericano) camisón (masculine)
  • 2 2.1 [Sch] [Univ] [Law/Derecho] toga (feminine) 2.2 [Medicine/Medicina] bata (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • He or she gives the patient a hospital gown and sees that all clothing and jewelry is given to a family member or sent to a service center for safekeeping.
    • After changing into a hospital gown, the patient lies on a cart or bed and covers his or her hair with a cap.
    • You will be in a hospital gown as zippers and snap fasteners can interfere with the scan.
    Example sentences
    • The teachers wore their academic gowns at all times and went swishing along the corridors between classes.
    • We lived in Graduate College and we ate together, particularly dinner at Procter Hall where academic gowns were required attire.
    • And, to ensure equitable treatment of both pupils and staff, teachers should surely be banned from wearing hoods on their academic gowns on speech day.

Definition of gown in:

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Cultural fact of the day

A piñata is a hollow figure made of cardboard, or from a clay pot lined with colored paper. Filled with fruit, candy, toys, etc, and hung up at parties, people take turns to stand in front of them blindfolded and try to break them with a stick. They feature in Mexican posadas posada and in children's parties there, in Cuba and in Spain.