Translation of gown in Spanish:

gown

Pronunciation: /gaʊn/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 (dress) vestido (masculine) evening/wedding gown traje (masculine) de fiesta/novia baptismal o christening gown faldón (masculine) bautismal
    More example sentences
    • Many cruises still offer one or more optional formal dinners where ladies where long formal gowns or other evening dresses and gentlemen wear tuxedos or dark suits.
    • All around there were hundreds of dresses and gowns for all occasions hanging upon the walls.
    • They dressed in their finest gowns of silk and satin, jewels of gold, elegant shoes and shawls.
    1.2
    (nightgown)
    (American English/inglés norteamericano) camisón (masculine)
  • 2 2.1 [Sch] [Univ] [Law/Derecho] toga (feminine) 2.2 [Medicine/Medicina] bata (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • He or she gives the patient a hospital gown and sees that all clothing and jewelry is given to a family member or sent to a service center for safekeeping.
    • After changing into a hospital gown, the patient lies on a cart or bed and covers his or her hair with a cap.
    • You will be in a hospital gown as zippers and snap fasteners can interfere with the scan.
    More example sentences
    • The teachers wore their academic gowns at all times and went swishing along the corridors between classes.
    • We lived in Graduate College and we ate together, particularly dinner at Procter Hall where academic gowns were required attire.
    • And, to ensure equitable treatment of both pupils and staff, teachers should surely be banned from wearing hoods on their academic gowns on speech day.

Definition of gown in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.