Translation of gradient in Spanish:

gradient

Pronunciation: /ˈgreɪdiənt/

n

  • 1.1 (slope) pendiente (f), cuesta (f), gradiente (f) (AmL) a gradient of 20% o of one in five una pendiente del 20%
    More example sentences
    • By following the ridge of the city's hills, it provides tolerable gradients and avoids steep inclines, which proliferate in the city's side streets.
    • Road sections which included steep gradients, major drainage structures and thick chip seal surface layers were normally excluded.
    • For traffic driving east, the road descends down a gradient of 0.023 through a wooded area with trees overhanging the road on both sides.
    1.2 [Math] [Phys] gradiente (m)
    More example sentences
    • The abrupt changes in gradient visible in the graph are caused when the number of relevant genetic backgrounds i max changes from one integer value to the next.
    • Differentiation is a method of working out the gradient of a curve - how quickly one variable changes with respect to another.
    • In a moment we will demonstrate what the gradient of the curve at a point is, by examining a limiting argument.
    More example sentences
    • Distinct gradients in pressure were observed throughout the contact area.
    • We observed a gradient in the depth of the selective sweep, which becomes progressively deeper as you get nearer to the gene.
    • I assure you, however, I have accurately mapped the topological surface density and transitional energy gradients of the timeline in question.

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peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.