There are 2 translations of heist in Spanish:

heist1

Pronunciation: /haɪst/

n

  • (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], golpe (masculine) [colloquial/familiar], atraco (masculine) to pull a heist dar* un golpe [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Bank robberies, cash-in-transit heists, petty crime and road accidents are all declining in the City of Johannesburg.
    • The heist began with the robbers deliberately setting off the alarm system and retreating into bushes.
    • A highly skilled thief is blackmailed into pulling a diamond heist when his daughter is kidnapped by an international terrorist.

Definition of heist in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of heist in Spanish:

heist2

vt

(American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar]
  • 1.1 (steal) afanar [slang/argot] 1.2 (rob) [place/person] atracar*
    More example sentences
    • When thieves heisted a car rented to cricket-star Brian Lara and the perpetrators discovered his bat in the vehicle, they returned it.
    • The brothers who own the house became part of the city's nouveau riche when they heisted a bank during the looting.
    • Disguises are assumed, safes are blown, millions of dollars are heisted according to a completely new and clever scheme, but this is pure escapism.

Definition of heist in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.