Translation of hiding in Spanish:

hiding

Pronunciation: /ˈhaɪdɪŋ/

n

  • 1 uncountable/no numerable (concealment) to be in hiding (from sb) estar* escondido (de algn) to go into hiding (from sb) esconderse (de algn) to come out of hiding salir* de su ( or mi etc) escondite (before noun/delante del nombre) hiding place escondite (m), escondrijo (m)
    More example sentences
    • A woman has gone into hiding after the businessman husband who tried to kill her was freed on bail, eight months into a 12-year jail term.
    • They say that African women in particular are desperate for asylum because of domestic violence in their home countries and that many have to go into hiding when they are deported.
    • The couple then went into hiding in Sheffield, first at a bed and breakfast and then at Foxhill Road for a couple of months.
  • 2 countable/numerable (beating) [colloquial/familiar] paliza (f), tunda (f) to give sb a good hiding darle* a algn una buena paliza or tunda the team got o took a terrible hiding from the champions los campeones le dieron una paliza tremenda al equipo [colloquial/familiar] to be on a hiding to nothing (British English/inglés británico) llevar todas las de perder [colloquial/familiar] he's on a hiding to nothing if he thinks that … está arreglado or (in Spain also/en España también) apañado si cree que …
    More example sentences
    • In 1956, it was called getting a thrashing, or a hiding - or just ‘getting it’.
    • I don't drink because I see a lot of people, they get hidings from their husbands.
    • I was always chicken when it came to getting hidings from my father.
    More example sentences
    • Scotland suffered a humiliating hiding in this international friendly at Hampden Park today.
    • A few results offered false hope - a victory on Boxing Day away to Motherwell, Livingston taking a hiding at Perth.
    • At 20-3 down they were looking at a real hiding, but they found some passion.

Definition of hiding in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.