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inert

Pronunciation: /ɪˈnɜːrt; ɪˈnɜːt/

Translation of inert in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [Chemistry/Química] inerte the inert gases los gases inertes
    Example sentences
    • Fluorine is so reactive that it forms compounds with the noble gases, which were thought to be chemically inert.
    • Airborne CFCs, which were relatively inert near Earth's surface, were being decomposed by sunlight in the upper atmosphere, releasing free chlorine atoms.
    • Neon is the second element in Group 18 of the periodic table, a group of elements known as the inert or noble gases.
    1.2 (immobile) [formal] (usually predicative/generalmente predicativo) inerte [formal]
    Example sentences
    • ‘We're looking for people who in 15 minutes can make an inert audience move,’ explains Jonny Rocket, who, with his wife Lisa, has organised the free event.
    • Two hours later, we watched through glass as her inert body was wheeled into the intensive care recovery.
    • Another man strode by with the inert body of a young child in his arms.
    Example sentences
    • Our political parties are inert, and that's the reason behind the emergence of the radical groups which are filling in the political vacuum.
    • Meanwhile, the intention is to turn whole command and control agencies into passive, inert organisms.
    • So is it just an unwillingness on the part of an inert legal community in this country that the jury system has not been adequately researched?

Definition of inert in:

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Cultural fact of the day

A piñata is a hollow figure made of cardboard, or from a clay pot lined with colored paper. Filled with fruit, candy, toys, etc, and hung up at parties, people take turns to stand in front of them blindfolded and try to break them with a stick. They feature in Mexican posadas posada and in children's parties there, in Cuba and in Spain.