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invade

Pronunciation: /ɪnˈveɪd/

Translation of invade in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [Military/Militar] invadir
    Example sentences
    • I think that the greatest revelation of the Iraq war has been that we lack the military force to invade a smallish country with terrain that provides easy surveillance and movement.
    • I am just inquiring, what was the British tradition in relation to maintaining discipline of its forces when they were invading countries like India?
    • British armed forces invaded Mesopotamia, as Iraq was then known, in 1914 with promises of freedom - from the Turks.
    1.2 (overrun) [room/environment] invadir to invade sb's privacy invadir or vulnerar la intimidad de algn
    Example sentences
    • Then, activists invaded the public space of lunch counters and voter registration offices simply to eat lunch and register to vote.
    • The minute he said that a heavy atmosphere of silence invaded the place.
    • He was someone special enough that they could let him invade their comfortable place.
    1.3 [Biology/Biología] [Medicine/Medicina] invadir
    Example sentences
    • They are not normally present in significant quantities until a plant is invaded by disease.
    • Plants are exposed to a great number of pathogenic microorganisms, but a relatively small proportion of them are able to invade plants and cause diseases.
    • Now when anything invades another cell, or particularly when a parasite invades a red blood cell, they have to multiply.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

Definition of invade in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.