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jejune
American English: /dʒəˈdʒun/
British English: /dʒɪˈdʒuːn/

Translation of jejune in Spanish:

adjective

[literary]
  • 1.1 (insipid)
    Example sentences
    • Every time there's an event that brings forth a manifestation of religious belief by large numbers of people, some militant secularist or other will give out an opinion that would be jejune coming from an intelligent sixth-former.
    • Like Whitman's poetry, Elvrum's lyrics are often as elementary as a child's jejune rambling, and yet, in their simplicity, they're sturdy, sophisticated, and poignantly inquisitive.
    • We've all perfected the wasp-wave; you flick your hand with a disinterested languor - just think Oscar Wilde dismissing a jejune insult - and the wind distracts the wasp for a second or two.
    Example sentences
    • Or perhaps your superiors realized that your rhetoric is sloppy, tendentious, jejune and banal, and they think - correctly - that this reflects on your employer, the FBI.
    • Seldon's authors, half of them academics, half journalists, are competent and fall down only in their often jejune judgments.
    • Contemporary reflections on Stauffenberg risk seeming rather jejune.
    1.2 (naive)
    (criticism/views)

Definition of jejune in:

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    Pronunciation: ˈhôdē
    adjective
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