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kernel

Pronunciation: /ˈkɜːrnl; ˈkɜːnl/

Translation of kernel in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • (of nut, fruit) almendra (feminine); (of corn, wheat) grano (masculine) the kernel of the matter el meollo de la cuestión there is a kernel of truth in his claim hay una pizca de verdad en lo que dice
    Example sentences
    • What are commonly thought of as spices today are a collection of seeds, berries, flowers, fruits, kernels, roots, rhizomes, leaves, arils, barks and saps that are used in cooking and food preparation.
    • Some of you may wonder how locals manage to work the edible kernel from its black shell within seconds, while holding a conversation.
    • At the heart of the fleshy fruit, snug within its stony kernel, lies a bitter seed that is purported to hold miraculous anti-tumour properties.
    Example sentences
    • The presence in wheat kernels of a cathepsin B gene led the search for its barley counterpart.
    • The quality of that flour is due, in large part, to the work of hundreds of different proteins that perform specialized tasks inside the wheat kernel, or grain.
    • Refined white flour is what's left after the nutrient-packed germ and bran are milled out of the wheat kernel.

Definition of kernel in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.