Translation of latch in Spanish:

latch

Pronunciation: /lætʃ/

noun/nombre

  • pasador (masculine), pestillo (masculine); (on lock) seguro (masculine) the door is on the latch la puerta no está cerrada con llave
    More example sentences
    • Within seconds, I had located the latch and opened the door.
    • Wasting no time I pulled on my trousers and buckled them, kicking into my shoes and grabbing my shirt and jacket when the door latch opened.
    • He fumbled for the latch to open his door, and left the limousine and the beautiful woman behind as quickly as he could.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • the door is latched la puerta está con pestillo or con el pasador echado

Phrasal verbs

latch on

verb + adverb (+ preposition + object)/verbo + adverbio (+ preposición + complemento)
(understand) [colloquial/familiar] agarrar or (Spain/España) coger* la onda to latch on to sth entender* or captar algo (realize) darse* cuenta de algo

latch onto

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento [colloquial/familiar]
1.1 (get hold of, catch) agarrarse de 1.2 (obtain) (American English/inglés norteamericano) hacerse* con, conseguir* 1.3 (attach oneself to) pegarse* a [colloquial/familiar] he latched onto our group se pegó a nuestro grupo [colloquial/familiar], se nos pegó [colloquial/familiar] she finally latched onto a rich widower al fin atrapó or [colloquial/familiar] pescó a un viudo rico 1.1 (perceive, seize on) she latched onto the idea very quickly enseguida captó la idea they soon latched onto the advantages offered by the scheme pronto se dieron cuenta de las ventajas que ofrecía el plan he latches onto the slightest error you make no te deja pasar ni el más mínimo error

Definition of latch in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.