Translation of layoff in Spanish:

layoff

Pronunciation: /ˈleɪɔːf; ˈleɪɒf/

n

  • 1.1 (act) (American English/inglés norteamericano) despido (masculine); (British English/inglés británico) suspensión temporal por falta de trabajo
    More example sentences
    • The temporary lay-off of over 650 workers at the mines will begin on November 17 and 50 workers will be kept on for essential maintenance.
    • A spokesman said lay-offs among temporary staff were part of the cyclical nature of the business and that the 350 permanent employees had not been affected.
    • ‘You would imagine that some of the negative speculation about the market and the recent spate of lay-offs would have had some effect, but so far there is no sign of it,’ he said.
    1.2 (period) período (m) de desempleo, paro (m) (Spain/España) , cesantía (feminine) (Chile)
    More example sentences
    • The British number one made his comeback last month after a lengthy lay-off with a shoulder injury, but lost his first two matches back on the tour.
    • Despite a lengthy lay-off from the sport, he showed that he has lost none of his speed or punching technique.
    • Injury in South Africa was yet another cruel blow to a young man who had fought back from a long period of enforced lay-off through injury.

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.