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liable

Pronunciation: /ˈlaɪəbəl/

Translation of liable in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

(predicative/predicativo)
  • 1 1.1 (responsible) reponsable to be liable for sth ser* responsable de algo, responder de algo to hold sb liable responsabilizar* a algn, considerar a algn responsable
    Example sentences
    • Might the host ever be legally liable for that injury?
    • As a general principle, people are not legally liable for failing to act, so that a distinction should be drawn between causing death and failing to keep the patient alive.
    • A corporation is vicariously liable for strict liability offences to exactly the same extent as a natural person.
    1.2 (subject)to be liable for/to sth you're not liable for military service estás exento de or no te corresponde prestar servicio militar any income is liable for tax cualquier ingreso es gravable or está sujeto a impuestos liable to alteration without notice sujeto a cambios sin previo aviso you will be liable to a 15% surcharge le pueden hacer un recargo del 15%
    Example sentences
    • Can we elect to have the whole of the income assessed to tax on my wife, who is only liable to basic rate tax?
    • Unlicensed fireworks displays, even on private property, are illegal and may render the participants liable to prosecution.
    • Failure to comply with any of those provisions will render building workers liable to imprisonment.
  • 2 2.1to be liable to + infinitive/infinitivo I'm liable to forget puede or es probable que me olvide the earlier model was liable to overheat el modelo anterior tenía tendencia a recalentarse 2.2 (susceptible) to be liable to sth ser* propenso a algo, tener* propensión a algo

Definition of liable in:

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Word of the day vedar
vt
to prohibit …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.